The toes have it!

The toes have it!

21.8.13

21.8.13

One of the most beautiful bees that visits my garden is a late summer visitor and is a frequent visitor to the Salvia.

24.8.13

24.8.13

She also likes to visit the Verbena bonariensis and is the eighth bee I hope to have identified.

26.8.13

26.8.13

Here she is cleverly camouflaged on the stalk of lavender.

Amegilla albigena head

I managed some close-up photographs which I found difficult to apply to Anthophora species.  I now think she is Amegilla albigena.  Her facial markings agree with a photograph in Atlas Hymenoptera and her lovely white hairs on the hind tibiae are distinctive.

The toes have it!

The toes have it!

I was concerned I could confuse her with an Anthophora but Amegilla do not have an arolia –  that is a little pad between their toes or tarsal claws.

Anthophora

This Anthophora shows what I mean.  There is a pad between the two tarsal claws.

Anthophora rear viewThe same bee viewed from the rear.  (I think it is Anthophora aestivalis.)  The arolia or pads are easily visible.

13.7.13

13.7.13

So many beautiful bees pass through the garden.  In the summer the Hollyhocks are very popular with a variety of bees.  I caught this shy looking male Anthophora in a Hollyhock.  I think it could be Anthophora bimaculata, male Tetralonia malvae – see comments.

11.8.13

11.8.13

This could be a female Anthophora bimaculata – Tetralonia malvae female – see comments.  She has beautiful long silky hairs, perfect to gather pollen on her hind legs.

14.7.13

14.7.13

I managed to photograph this little beauty which I thought was Anthophora bimaculata but she flew away before I could take another  picture.  Anthophora are fast movers!

I’m still left with lots of Anthophora to identify which will probably have to wait until next summer but I know more now what to look for.

But I think the toes have it for my Amegilla (Zebramegilla) albigena.

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